Protesters Oppose Port of Lewiston Expansion as Transportation Secretary LaHood Visits


State to Pay Fired ITD Director Pam Lowe $750,000 and Protesters Oppose Port of Lewiston Expansion as Transportation Secretary LaHood Visits between 18:30 and 4:30 on the Wednesday, August 22, KRFP Radio Free Moscow Evening Report, Port Expansion Opposed

Local Anti-Megaloads Activist Travels to Tar Sands


Local Anti-Megaloads Activist Travels to Tar Sands between 7:57 and 1:08 on the Thursday, August 9, KRFP Radio Free Moscow Evening Report, Tar Sands Healing Walk

Washington/Idaho Megaload Resistance


[NOTE: This press release and accompanying photos garnered public exposure of our frontline tar sands activism through three media outlets.  On May 22, lead Rising Tide organizer Scott Parkin posted our description of Spokane protests against ExxonMobil/Imperial Oil’s tar sands construction/transportation invasion of the Northwest as Tar Sands Megaload Fight Moves West to Spokane on the Rising Tide North America website and in the online newsletter It’s Getting Hot in Here: Dispatches from the Youth Climate Movement.  On the same day, when over 1000 visitors viewed their internet site, the Earth First! Newswire also ran our story about Occupy Spokane/WIRT’s May 20 demonstration.]

At about 11:30 pm on Sunday night, May 20, a dozen activists from Occupy Spokane and Wild Idaho Rising Tide converged in Spokane, Washington, to protest megaloads of oversized equipment bound for Alberta tar sands operations from the Port of Pasco.  ExxonMobil/Imperial Oil has been using Highway 395, Interstate 90, and city streets in Spokane and Spokane Valley since mid-October to transport road damaging shipments weighing up to 400,000 pounds and stretching over 200 feet long.  Diverted in Idaho from their originally intended Highway 12 route by court challenges and from their alternative Highway 95 path by Moscow area protests, these pieces of a tar sands/bitumen processing plant will expand Canadian carbon fuel extraction, American dependence on oil, and continental greenhouse gas emissions, while reaping hefty profits for one of the wealthiest corporations on Earth. Continue reading

Wisdom, Not Hypocrisy


Peter Adrian, Pullman

The Moscow-Pullman Daily News 5/16/12

Tucked in among the political endorsements on Thursday’s editorial page (May 10) was a tart bit of criticism from Frank Luzzo, accusing (it is presumed) the megaloads protesters and those who support them of hypocrisy.

I beg to differ.  It is not hypocrisy to realize that an energy extraction process which requires more energy input than it returns as output is unsustainable; that allowing one’s community to be used as a doormat for corporate profiteering is ultimately destructive to that community; that the growth-obsessed, consumption-driven economy in which we grew up has brought us to the brink of ecological catastrophe; that the extent of our benefit from the era of cheap oil should be the measure of our responsibility for leading the transition away from it; and that we, as a society, have been headed the wrong way, and it is time to change course.

That is not hypocrisy.  It is wisdom.

Spokane Climate Justice Protest against ExxonMobil’s Megaloads 5-6-12


In recognition of International Stop the Tar Sands/Climate Impacts Day on Saturday, a group of about eight activists met near East Third Avenue in Spokane, Washington, on Sunday evening, May 6, to protest megaloads of oversized equipment bound for Alberta tar sands operations from the Port of Pasco.  ExxonMobil/Imperial Oil has been using Highway 395, Interstate 90, and city streets in Spokane and Spokane Valley since mid-October to transport road damaging shipments weighing up to 400,000 pounds and stretching over 200 feet long.  Diverted in Idaho from their originally intended Highway 12 route by court challenges and from their alternative Highway 95 path by Moscow area protests, these pieces of a tar sands/bitumen processing plant will expand Canadian carbon fuel extraction, American dependence on oil, and continental greenhouse gas emissions, while reaping exorbitant profits for one of the wealthiest corporations on Earth. Continue reading

Sentencing Hearing of March 4 Megaload Blockaders


On Friday, April 6, at 1:00 pm, Cass Davis and Jim Prall will offer statements that describe their reasons for protesting and blocking three transports of tar sands processing equipment that traversed Moscow, Idaho, late on Sunday evening, March 4, 2012.  Idaho state and Moscow city police arrested, jailed, and charged Cass and Jim for disturbing the peace at the intersection of Fourth and Washington streets.  Represented by Dana Johnson of the Northern Rockies Justice Center, both defendants have pled guilty to their misdemeanors and will personally present their motives during their sentencing hearing before Judge John Judge in the Latah County Courthouse.  The officially recorded session is open to the public and reporters, but normal courtroom policy disallows recording devices such as cameras and camcorders.  Please join community members and friends at 1:00 pm on Friday afternoon for this hearing at 522 South Adams Street in Moscow. Continue reading

Foes of Megaloads Face the Music


Helen Yost

MOSCOW – The last megaloads have reportedly passed through downtown here, leaving behind 11 misdemeanor court cases against people who protested shipment of infrastructure equipment to Canadian oil fields.

Last to plead innocent to two allegations was Helen Yost, 54, of Moscow. Yost, spokeswoman for Wild Idaho Rising Tide and an organizer of the months-long protests, appeared in Latah County Court here Wednesday morning.

She is charged with two misdemeanors for allegedly throwing a sign at a megaload and attempted battery of a Moscow police officer. She and two other demonstrators, Cass Davis, 47, and James Prall, 67, both of Moscow, have pretrial conferences set for April 3, according to court records.

Davis and Prall were arrested March 4 during a protest and charged with resisting, or obstructing police for allegedly refusing to stay out of the roadway when oversize loads were moving through town on Washington Street. Yost received citations for her actions two nights later, after she publicly admitted that she threw a sign and “air-kicked the transports and their police escorts out of town.” Continue reading

Megaload Protester Faces Charge for Throwing Sign at Truck


Wild Idaho Rising Tide protester Helen Yost faces a misdemeanor charge in connection to her last act of protest against two Imperial Oil refinery modules that came through Moscow last week.

The 54-year-old Moscow woman was charged in Latah County Second District Court with throwing a substance at a vehicle after she threw her cardboard protest sign at one of the passing tractor-trailers as it came through Washington Street on March 6.  She was cited Thursday and will have an initial court appearance [at 8:30 am on] March 21.

Yost is also set for trial in Kootenai County for a charge of obstructing an officer in connection with her arrest in August 2011 by an Idaho State Police trooper while monitoring module transports, where she said she refused to give the law enforcement officer her license.  She was also cited at that time with failing to wear her seatbelt, which she said was because the vehicle she was in was parked at the time.  Her trial in Kootenai County is set for May 14.

(By The Moscow-Pullman Daily News)

Media Release: More Charges Brought Against Tar Sands “Megaload” Protesters in Moscow, Idaho


As some of the last five of over 70 massive parts of an Alberta tar sands upgrader plant rumbled through the small, quiet, college town of Moscow, Idaho, at about 11 pm on Sunday, March 4, four protesters linked arms and sat down in the middle of Washington Street to stop three of these “megaloads” weighing 200,000 to 415,000 pounds and measuring 150 to 200 feet long.  Police arrested Cass Davis and Jim Prall for resisting and obstructing officers and dragged Jeanne McHale and Pat Monger to the sidewalk, as another 40 protesters voiced their opposition to expanding tar sands mining operations.  Again on Tuesday, March 6, when the final two similarly huge shipments crossed this 22,000-person city, demonstrators pounded drums, chanted slogans, played music, and engaged in street theater.  Helen Yost tossed a cardboard protest sign at the rear of the last megaload and air-kicked the transports and their police escorts out of town, resulting in misdemeanor charges for throwing an object at a moving highway vehicle and attempted battery of a peace officer.

All three accused protesters are pleading not guilty based on the necessity of their actions induced by their moral obligation to directly confront the causes of climate change that are currently killing millions of people, plants, and animals around the globe.  For their statements, please listen to Cass Davis and Jim Prall on Flashpoints and Helen Yost on KRFP Radio Free Moscow.  Other articles, photos, and videos of numerous megaload passages and protests are available on the Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) facebook page and website. Continue reading