Climate Justice Forum: Larry Hildes on Dropped Coal Train Blockade Charges, Ziggy Siegfried on 140 NoDAPL Arrests, Additional Northwest Coal Trains, & Idaho Oil and Gas Lease Auction Protest 10-26-16


The Wednesday, October 26, 2016 Climate Justice Forum radio program hosted by regional climate activist collective Wild Idaho Rising Tide features a conversation with attorney Larry Hildes about dismissed charges by the City of Bellingham and Whatcom County against three Chuckanut Bay, Washington coal train blockaders, and an interview with Spokane climate and environmental activist Ziggy Siegfried, who observed the 140 arrests of Standing Rock Lakota and allied water protectors near the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota last Saturday.  We also discuss the current rail transport diversion of 11 additional, weekly, Northwest coal trains from the dropped Boardman, Oregon terminal proposal to a Vancouver, B.C. coal export facility, and the Third Idaho Oil and Gas Lease Auction Protest at the Idaho Department of Lands in Boise.  Broadcast on progressive, volunteer, community station KRFP Radio Free Moscow every Wednesday between 1:30 and 3 pm PDT, live at 90.3 FM and online, the show covers continent-wide climate activism and community opposition to extreme energy projects, thanks to the generous, anonymous listener who adopted program host Helen Yost as her KRFP DJ.

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Red Power Energy Screening & Discussion


red-energy-power-flyer

Red Power Energy Screening & Discussion

7 pm, Thursday, October 27

Little Panida Theater

300 North First Avenue, Sandpoint, Idaho

Support for Standing Rock Sioux legal defense fund

Discussion with Kalispel Tribe members & canoeists

Suggested $5 or more admission donation

Across the American West, indigenous tribes are grappling with the dilemma of balancing development of energy resources on their ancestral homelands with sustaining their traditional beliefs of respect and care for the Earth. Previously the victims of environmental degradation and federal mismanagement, Native people are in the midst of an extraordinary resurgence within the current, controversial, energy and climate change debate.  Many tribes are challenging long-held stereotypes, asserting their sovereign rights to control their lands, and implementing strategies to develop their natural and mineral resources without further disrupting their environment.  As microcosms of conflicts between progress and tradition, between the material needs of today and the potentially negative consequences of tomorrow, American Indian reservations hold ten percent of potential renewable energy, 20 percent of known oil and gas reserves, and 30 percent of the coal reserves in the United States west of the Mississippi River.  As demands for energy increase, so does the pursuit of untapped resources, both below and above the ground.

Among Washington coastal tribes, the Lummi Nation has victoriously opposed the massive Gateway Pacific coal train and export terminal at Cherry Point, while the Swinomish Indian tribal community has successfully resisted a Shell oil-by-rail unloading facility at an Anacortes refinery. Both tribes have effectively stopped proposed fossil fuel projects through legal challenges protecting their treaty rights and with supportive community participation in public processes, rallies, marches, rail blockades, and intertribal networking.  But the litigation and direct actions of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and allies continue, through efforts to protect their water and land for future generations from Dakota Access pipeline construction and operation impacts.  Tunneling from North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to Illinois, this Bakken oil pipeline would cross under the Missouri River upstream of their reservation in North Dakota, polluting their drinking water sources and threatening their burial grounds and sacred sites.  Symbolizing the ongoing Native struggle between tradition and progress, this fossil fuel project has galvanized thousands of Indians from over 200 tribes to gather with the Standing Rock Sioux in peaceful and prayerful resistance along the pipeline route near the Cannonball River.

Sponsored by the Idaho Mythweaver and Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT), a public screening of the new documentary Red Power Energy and an indigenous-led discussion of Dakota Access pipeline opposition together serve as a fundraiser for the Standing Rock Sioux legal defense fund, with suggested theater admission donations of $5 or more.  Immediately after the one-hour film, showing at 7 pm on Thursday, October 27, at the Little Panida Theater (300 North First Avenue, Sandpoint, Idaho), members of the Kalispel Tribe of Indians will speak about their participation in the Standing Rock convergence and in a multi-tribal protest where they paddled their traditional dugout canoe on the Missouri River from Bismarck, North Dakota, to the Cannonball River confluence. Continue reading

Climate Justice Forum: Nez Perce Activist Gary Dorr Presentation & Dakota Access Pipeline Resister Interviews 10-19-16


The Wednesday, October 19, 2016 Climate Justice Forum radio program hosted by regional climate activist collective Wild Idaho Rising Tide features an October 18 talk by Nimiipuu (Nez Perce) activist and General Council Chairman Gary Dorr about Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipeline resistance, Highway 12 megaload opposition, and other indigenous environmental issues.  We also share interviews with frontline tribal activists protecting waters and lands from the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, including Debra Gonette, LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, and Kelly Love.  Broadcast on progressive, volunteer, community station KRFP Radio Free Moscow every Wednesday between 1:30 and 3 pm PDT, live at 90.3 FM and online, the show covers continent-wide climate activism and community opposition to extreme energy projects, thanks to the generous, anonymous listener who adopted program host Helen Yost as her KRFP DJ.

Third Idaho Oil & Gas Lease Auction Protest


idaho-oil-gas-lease-tracts-for-auction-10-19-16

On Wednesday morning, October 19, southwest Idaho activists and Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) are holding the third protest of a state oil and gas lease auction.  The Idaho State Board of Land Commissioners is selling 225 oil and gas leases of state lands and minerals at another public auction in Suite 103 Syringa North and South Conference Rooms at the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) offices, 300 North Sixth Street in Boise, Idaho [1].

Before bidder arrival for registration begins at 8:30 am MDT for the 9 am auction, gather with us at 8 am at the east side of Capitol Park, across the street from IDL, and then on the public sidewalk in front of the main IDL west entrance.  Please bring your posters, signs, chants, and songs objecting to further liquidation of state resources for private industry profit, despite state-perceived benefits for public agencies, institutions, and programs.  See descriptions of the last two state oil and gas lease auction protests for ideas about messages and tactics to challenge this first such state auction in over two years [2-5].

The state of Idaho has already, currently leased tens of thousands of surface and subsurface acres to only a few companies, for looming oil and gas drilling and potential hydraulic fracturing, acidizing, and other risky well stimulation treatments.  Since 2009, Bridge Resources and its more aggressive successor, Alta Mesa of Houston, Texas, have drilled or received state permits for dozens of wells, planning more dirty energy development for the Treasure Valley and elsewhere in Idaho than the company ever reveals.

Apparent from the strange placement of bargain priced lease parcels, shown in the maps of this October 19 round of IDL auctions, the latest scheme of Alta Mesa and bidder accomplices may involve visions of corridors for access, transportation, pipelines, or other infrastructure.  The state is almost giving away 4,404 acres in seven counties as 82 oil and gas leases in Canyon County, 73 in Payette County, 31 in Gem County, 23 in Ada County, 13 in Washington County, two in Bonneville County, and one oil and gas lease in Cassia County.  Remarkably, most of these leases lie along and adjacent to ten state and federal highways in the Treasure Valley – Idaho Highways 16, 19, 44, 52, 55, and 72, U.S. Highways 20, 30, and 95, and Interstate 84 – all threatening blocked public access to private lands [6, enclosed photo]. Continue reading

Comment by Friday on ITD’s Proposed Highway 12 Megaload Rules!


Nickel Brothers Weyerhaeuser Highway 12 Megaload

Nickel Brothers Weyerhaeuser Highway 12 Megaload

On Wednesday, September 28, dozens of Nimiipuu (Nez Perce) activists, friends, and allies across the state rallied in solidarity and spoke at concurrent, teleconferenced, public hearings on U.S. Highway 12 megaload rules proposed by the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD), at its headquarters in Boise and its district offices in Coeur d’Alene, Lewiston, Pocatello, Rigby, and Shoshone [1]. As the region prepares to confront another onslaught of megaloads through the ancestral lands and waters of the Nimiipuu people, protectors requested the presence of legal observers, state legislators, and various protest props signifying exclusion from public processes at these statewide hearings and accompanying demonstrations.

Police but no protests attended the Lewiston hearing, where Nimiipuu tribal members expressed concerns about their homelands above the Nez Perce Reservation, still essential to traditional hunting, fishing, and gathering practices in the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest and the Lochsa-Middle Fork Clearwater Wild and Scenic River corridor in north-central Idaho. “Members of the Nez Perce Tribe have made it clear that, if megaloads return to U.S. 12, they’ll once again meet the shipments with protest.  ‘If those loads roll through here, [protests] will happen,’ Mary Jane Oatman, of Kamiah, told the Lewiston Tribune.  ‘I guarantee it will happen.’” [2, 3]

Although tribal officials did not participate in the Lewiston hearing, the Tribe issued a strong, critical statement against ITD’s “ineffectual” proposed rulemaking on Highway 12 megaloads [4]. The statement revealed that “ITD made no effort to contact the Nez Perce Tribe or the U.S. Forest Service before unilaterally proposing this rule.”  Amid three years of ongoing, confidential mediation among the Tribe, Forest Service, and Idaho Rivers United, mandated by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after a federal judge placed an injunction on certain Highway 12 megaloads, the statement also disclosed that these litigants invited ITD to join their negotiations in 2015.  ITD apparently declined this offer, intent on maintaining and imposing its perceived megaload permitting authority on unreceptive tribal and allied Highway 12 corridor residents and American citizens concerned about their public lands and waters.

Since October 2015, the most successful Highway 12 megaload hauler has applied for permits from ITD to move more behemoths of unknown kind and destination along the same route through the reservation, national forest, and protected river corridor. This Nickel Brothers application probably explains ITD’s rush to devise new Highway 12 megaload rules that attempt to circumvent federal court-ordered mediation.  While Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) and allies monitored, protested, blockaded, and got arrested for resisting ExxonMobil/Imperial Oil tar sands megaloads rerouted from Highway 12 to U.S. Highway 95 and downtown Moscow streets in 2011 and 2012, Nickel Brothers transported 23 “unchallenged” megaloads up Highway 12 to a Weyerhaeuser pulp and paper mill in Grand Prairie, western Alberta [5, 6, enclosed photo].  Allies tried to convince WIRT to confront these shipments, then asked us not to protest the first Highway 12 megaloads to reach Alberta tar sands operations in late 2012, before the Nez Perce rose up in August 2013. Continue reading

Climate Justice Forum: Blockade of Five Tar Sands Pipelines, ITD Highway 12 Megaload Rules, Upcoming Oil & Gas Lease Auction Protest, Abandoned Shell Oil-by-Rail Facility Proposal 10-12-16


The Wednesday, October 12, 2016 Climate Justice Forum radio program hosted by regional climate activist collective Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) shares news about a blockade of all five western U.S. tar sands pipelines, the comment deadline for proposed Idaho Transportation Department rules on Highway 12 megaloads, an upcoming, fifth, oil and gas lease auction protest in Boise, Shell’s abandonment of an Anacortes oil-by-rail offloading facility proposal, and Sandpoint events supporting Standing Rock tribal and allied Dakota Access Pipeline resistance.  Broadcast on progressive, volunteer, community station KRFP Radio Free Moscow every Wednesday between 1:30 and 3 pm PDT, live at 90.3 FM and online, the show covers continent-wide climate activism and community opposition to extreme energy projects, thanks to the generous, anonymous listener who adopted program host Helen Yost as her KRFP DJ.

Paradise Ridge Defense Coalition Benefit Concert with Tom Neilson


tom-neilson-moscow-concert-flyer

Paradise Ridge Defense Coalition Benefit Concert with Tom Neilson

7 pm, Saturday, October 8

Unitarian Universalist Church of the Palouse,

420 East Second Street, Moscow, Idaho

$10 suggested admission donation

Several north Idaho groups are co-hosting the Paradise Ridge Defense Coalition Benefit Concert, offered by singer-songwriter and long-time activist Tom Neilson, in Moscow on Saturday, October 8. Dubbed the Jon Stewart of folk music, Tom offers inspiration through his music to effect change [1].  He has performed his award-winning songs of humor and compassion in 21 countries on five continents.  His songs about historical and current events reflect his travels, intertwined with his farm roots and his fervent commitment to social justice.  Audiences celebrate Tom’s lyrics for their political astuteness, sophistication, and wit.

Concert co-sponsors Palouse Environmental Sustainability Coalition (PESC) and Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) gratefully welcome everyone to participate in this community event providing a gathering place for people supporting the legal expenses of the Paradise Ridge Defense Coalition (PRDC), of which PESC and WIRT are grassroots, allied, member organizations. On August 18, PRDC filed a legal complaint against the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) and the Federal Highway Administration in U.S. District Court for Idaho, challenging their environmental impact statement and record of decision issued for reconstructing, relocating, and expanding 6.5 miles of U.S. Highway 95 immediately south of Moscow [2-6].

Protecting nearby Paradise Ridge from inappropriate highway realignment since 2003, PRDC is disputing these agencies’ studies and selection of E-2, the easternmost of three proposed Highway 95 routes. ITD’s stubborn commitment to building the controversial E-2 route over the shoulder of Paradise Ridge threatens some of the best remnants of the estimated less than one percent of remaining, native, Palouse Prairie vegetation with weed invasion, wetland and prime farmland destruction, and wildlife habitat reduction.  The higher, 2,800- to 3,000-foot elevation of E-2 would subject highway travelers to more accidents during inclement and winter weather conditions, when 57 percent of mishaps on the current highway section occur, and would also risk more big game collisions closer to their habitat.

For this Saturday, October 8 opportunity for the Moscow-Pullman and greater Palouse community to support PRDC, the doors open at 6:30 pm at the Unitarian Universalist Church of the Palouse, 420 East Second Street in Moscow, Idaho. Activist musician Tom Neilson begins his performance at 7 pm, for $10 suggested admission donations.  See the enclosed descriptions of Tom Neilson’s background and Paradise Ridge Defense Coalition concerns, and peruse the websites and facebook pages of Tom, PRDC, PESC, and WIRT, for further information about these endeavors [1-5].

Please print and post the linked, color, letter-sized, PDF version of the Tom Neilson Moscow Concert Flyer (tom-neilson-moscow-concert-flyer), invite your friends and family through the email messages and website and facebook links about this event, participate in this Paradise Ridge Defense Coalition Benefit Concert, and enjoy the rousing music of Tom Neilson! Continue reading

Climate Justice Forum: Second Spokane Fossil Fuel Train Blockade, Highway 12 Megaload Rules Hearings, Upcoming Benefit Concerts & State Oil & Gas Lease Auction Protest, & 200 Iowa Arrests of Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters 10-5-16


The Wednesday, October 5, 2016 Climate Justice Forum radio program hosted by regional climate activist collective Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) shares news about a second Spokane blockade of BNSF oil trains by Veterans for Peace and Direct Action Spokane, statewide hearings on proposed Idaho Transportation Department rules for Highway 12 megaloads, upcoming benefit concerts and a state oil and gas lease auction protest, Spokane City Council support of the Standing Rock tribal and allied Dakota Access Pipeline resistance, and almost 200 arrests and attempted camp eviction of activists in Iowa stopping Dakota Access Pipeline construction under the Mississippi River.  Broadcast on progressive, volunteer, community station KRFP Radio Free Moscow every Wednesday between 1:30 and 3 pm PDT, live at 90.3 FM and online, the show covers continent-wide climate activism and community opposition to extreme energy projects, thanks to the generous, anonymous listener who adopted program host Helen Yost as her KRFP DJ.

Music for Change – Tom Neilson Benefit Concert


tom-neilson-sandpoint-concert-flyer

Music for Change – Tom Neilson Benefit Concert

Sunday, October 9, 2016

5:30 pm optional, reserved dinner (208-263-0846), 7:30 pm concert

Di Luna’s Café, 207 Cedar Street, Sandpoint, Idaho

$10+ suggested admission donation

Two north Idaho groups are co-hosting a special benefit concert, offered by singer-songwriter and long-time activist Tom Neilson, in Sandpoint on Sunday, October 9 [1-2]. Dubbed the Jon Stewart of folk music, Tom offers inspiration through his music to effect change [3].  He has performed his award-winning songs of humor and compassion in 21 countries on five continents.  His songs about historical and current events reflect his travels, intertwined with his farm roots and his fervent commitment to social justice.  Audiences celebrate Tom’s lyrics for their political astuteness, sophistication, and wit.

Event co-sponsors 350Sandpoint and Wild Idaho Rising Tide gratefully welcome everyone to participate in this community event providing a gathering place for people involved in solving the climate crisis and overcoming the regional impacts of global pollution.

350Sandpoint is a chapter of 350.org, a global, grassroots, climate movement founded by Bill McKibben. Jean Gerth, who co-founded the local group with Jim Akers, Nancy Gerth, and Gary Payton, states, “We want to see the people of Bonner County come together to address climate change and to support each other in a sometimes overwhelming process.”

As part of an international, volunteer network of activists, Wild Idaho Rising Tide (WIRT) confronts the root causes of climate change by coordinating direct actions and promoting locally organized solutions. WIRT activist Helen Yost says, “The frontline resistance of indigenous and allied communities peacefully challenging coal, oil, tar sands, and natural gas extraction and transportation projects continues to inspire Idahoans to work together across the region to halt new fossil fuel infrastructure that would pollute the environment and climate.”

For this Sunday, October 9 benefit event, the doors open at 5:30 pm for optional dinner by reservation at Di Luna’s Café, 207 Cedar Street in Sandpoint, Idaho. Please call Di Luna’s at 208-263-0846 for your reservation.  Activist musician Tom Neilson begins his performance there at 7:30 pm, for $10 suggested donations supporting 350Sandpoint and WIRT.

For further information, see the enclosed description of Tom Neilson’s background, peruse the websites and facebook pages of Tom, 350Sandpoint, and WIRT, and/or contact info@sandpoint350.org and wild.idaho.rising.tide@gmail.com [1-3].

Please print and post the linked, color, letter-sized, PDF version of the Tom Neilson Sandpoint Concert Flyer (tom-neilson-sandpoint-concert-flyer), invite your friends and family through the email messages and website and facebook links about this event, participate in this Music for Change Benefit Concert, and enjoy the rousing music of Tom Neilson! Continue reading

Standing Rock Solidarity Benefit Concert with Tom Neilson


tom-neilson-boise-concert-flyer

Standing Rock Solidarity Benefit Concert with Tom Neilson

7 pm, Friday, October 7

Linen Building, 1402 West Grove Street, Boise, Idaho

$10 suggested admission donation

Several Idaho groups are co-hosting the Standing Rock Solidarity Benefit Concert offered by singer-songwriter and long-time activist Tom Neilson in Boise, October 7 [1-3]. Dubbed the Jon Stewart of folk music, Tom offers inspiration through his music to effect change [4].  He has performed his award-winning songs of humor and compassion in 21 countries on five continents.  His songs about historical and current events reflect his travels, intertwined with his farm roots and fervent commitment to social justice.  Audiences celebrate Tom’s lyrics for their political astuteness, sophistication, and wit.

The Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, Shoshone Paiute tribal members of Duck Valley, and Wild Idaho Rising Tide gratefully welcome everyone to participate in this community event providing a gathering place for people supporting the indigenous and allied Sacred Stone, Red Warrior, and Oceti Sakowin camps actively protecting waters and lands from the threats of Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) construction and operation near the confluence of the Cannonball and Missouri rivers in North Dakota and throughout its route to Illinois.

The frontline resistance of these and other grassroots communities peacefully confronting coal, oil, tar sands, and natural gas extraction and transportation projects continues to inspire Idahoans to work together across the region to defend human rights and tribal sovereignty, to seek racial and gender justice, and to halt new fossil fuel infrastructure that would pollute both the environment and the climate.

For this Friday, October 7 benefit event, the doors open at 6:30 pm at the Linen Building, 1402 West Grove Street in Boise, Idaho. Activist musician Tom Neilson begins his performance at 7 pm, for $10 suggested donations.  For further information, see the enclosed descriptions of Tom Neilson’s background and Dakota Access Pipeline concerns, and peruse the websites and facebook pages of Tom and the NoDAPL resistance camps [5-8].

Please print and post the linked, color, letter-sized, PDF version of the Tom Neilson Boise Concert Flyer (tom-neilson-boise-concert-flyer), invite your friends and family through the email messages and website and facebook links about this event, participate in this Standing Rock Solidarity Benefit Concert, and enjoy the rousing music of Tom Neilson! Continue reading